Cooking by kittee:    
kittee@pakupaku.info


Close your eyes and think about the coolest, most Mojo person you know. Chances are they've reclaimed the long lost eleventh commandment. "Thou Shalt Peel Thy Nightshade Known as Thy Tomato." If you want the flow too, it's yours for the grabbing. Goh. What a huge-assed mistake Moses made when he forgot to tell us about this one! Peeling tomatoes creates godliness in cooked dishes by creating an aesthetic and tastier presentation, and, ooh-la-la, did I mention texture? Tomato skins naturally come off when the fruit is heated. So, if you don't get the skin off before you cook them, the tomato will do it for you. Who wants a dish full of those spiky little cigar sticks that your wiser-than-you Grandma will have to pick out of her mouth?


Here's how you do it. In five easy steps.

  1. Put about three inches of water into a pot and bring it to a boil. If you're peeling a bunch of tomatoes put a bigger pot on so you can do them all at once.
  2. Get your tomatoes, they can be any variety. Pick up a tomato and turn it over so the stem area is on the bottom.
  3. Score an X just through the skin of the fruit. Avoid slicing into the flesh and aim for smack in the middle. Repeat with the other tomatoes.
  4. When the water is boiling, drop each tomato into the pot. You want every tomato submerged for about 30 seconds. If the tomato is not completely covered by the water, just make sure that all sides get their time under the water. Avoid over-boiling the tomato because it will begin to cook in the water. The skin should begin to peel off in the area where you made the X. Oftentimes, the skin on the sides of the tomato will also have cracked.
  5. Drain the water, or pull the tomatoes out with a fork. Immediately place the tomatoes in a cold water bath, or put them in a colander under cold running water. At this point, the skins should easily slip off the fruit. Use a knife to cut the skin away from the sepal area.

Cooking by kittee:    
kittee@pakupaku.info